Editor's note: This story has been updated as new information became available. Also, a new number of additional cases, 507, has been added, up from 506 reported earlier in this story. A new development also came in this morning of a new  CORVID-19 case in Ogemaw County. Also, two new cases in the region have been reported in Oscoda County.

by John Morris

TAWAS CITY – Testing through the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) has identified District Health Department No 2’s (DHD2) first presumptive positive case for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), according to a news release issued Wednesday morning, March 25. 

However, the state, through its coronavirus website, called the case in Iosco County confirmed for COVID-19, by 2 p.m. Wednesday. Earlier in the day, the DHD2 said the specimen will be sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for confirmatory testing.

The presumptive positive individual is a female from Iosco County. According to DHD2, the patient is in isolation and is in stable condition at this time. DHD2 is working with those who have been in close contact with the patient. Contacts will be quarantined and monitored appropriately.

No other information about the woman is being released by the DHD2.

“At this time, I advise the public to abide by the Governor’s Executive Order to Stay Home and Stay Safe,” said Denise Bryan, health officer for DHD2, who made the announcement on Wednesday.

State Rep. Sue Allor also on Wednesday advised families of the 106th District to stay vigilant but calm after the first case of coronavirus was confirmed in the area.

The state announced an additional 507 cases today, which brings the total number of confirmed to 2,295 – including the one in Iosco County. There are 43 confirmed deaths in Michigan from COVID-19.

“It’s definitely concerning to learn the first case of this virus has been confirmed in our community,” Allor said. “Every day, more and more positive cases are being identified, and it was only a matter of time before the virus would make its way here, too. 

“I urge everyone to continue to practice social distancing, take the appropriate precautions such as hand washing, and most importantly – stay calm.  I know it’s been difficult, but we will get through this together.”

Allor said her heart goes out to the individual who tested positive for the virus and extends her prayers for recovery.

On Thursday, March 26, DHD2 announced the first “presumptive positive” case in Ogemaw County – a male. The health department again gives no additional information on the person.

Two new "presumptive positive" cases in Oscoda County were announced March 30 by DHD2 - a male and a female. The DHD2 said both patients are in isolation and in stable condition at this time. No other information was released about the patients. DHD2 said it is working with those who have been in close contact with the patient. Contacts will be quarantined and monitored appropriately, according to DHD2. 

“As we continue to see additional cases of COVID-19 (Coronavirus) in the DHD2 jurisdiction, I cannot stress enough the importance of following the Governor’s Executive Order of Stay Home, Stay Safe,” Bryan said Thursday.

“The importance of prevention measures such as hand washing, covering coughs and sneezes and social distancing are clear,” said Dr. Mark Hamed, medical director for DHD2. “We are working with this individual to make sure their needs are met during this time and are wishing them a speedy recovery.” 

According to DHD2, COVID-19 symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus. Symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath. If you feel well, you do not need to be tested. Mildly ill people are encouraged to stay home and contact their healthcare provider by phone for guidance. 

For reputable COVID-19 updates visit:

www.cdc.gov/coronavirus

www.michigan.gov/coronavirus

www.dhd2.org/COVID-19.

According to DHD2, COVID-19 symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure to the virus. Symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath. If you feel well, you do not need to be tested. Mildly ill people are encouraged to stay home and contact their healthcare provider by phone for guidance.

Based upon the increase in COVID-19 cases statewide, DHD2 urges community members to continue to be cooperative with the recommendations to keep yourself and others safe. This will help prevent additional spread and save essential healthcare resources for those considered high risk and who may need supportive care, the DHD2 said in its press release.

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